Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Research Blog #6: Visual


This visual graphic illustrates my project because my main focus is about sexual assault, more specifically on college campuses. This image is significant because students, both males and females, are attempting to get the attention of an administration, the university, students, and the media to spread of awareness of sexual assault. Not only that, in the picture they are advocating for a change or more regulations to protect victims of sexual assault. My paper focuses on the victim's experience and their decisions whether or not to report sexual assault to the university. This picture supports my paper because students feel alone and misguided because universities do not provide adequate support for victims which in turn, causes students to respond in different ways.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Literature Review #4

(1)    Visual: 

(2)    Citation: 
Sable, Marjorie R., et al. "Barriers to Reporting Sexual Assault for Women and Men: Perspectives of College Students." Journal of American College Health, vol. 55, no. 3-, 01 Jan. 2006, pp. 157-162. EBSCOhost, login.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ767223&site=eds-live

(3)    Summary: The writers of this academic article asked college students, both men and women, what are the barriers to reporting sexual assault. They found that the same barriers exist today that did 30 years ago. Both genders expressed concerns about being embarrassed, perceived as "gay", shame, and guilt. The article goes into depth about the emotions and opinions students had about the issue of sexual assault whether they were a victim or not. 

(4)    Author(s): Marjorie Sable is a professor at the University of Missouri and her research was funded by the Department of Social Work. She is an accredited author because of her DrPH, MPH, MSW background and her interest in domestic violence and sexual assault. 

(5)    Key terms: 
Revictimization- (1) make someone a victim or sacrifice (2) punish someone unjustly, or (3) swindle or defraud someone

Sexual offense- a statutory offense that provides that it is a crime to knowingly cause another person to engage in an unwanted sexual act by force or threat

(6)    Quotes: "The terms sexual assault and sexual abuse are often used interchangeably and refer to "unwanted sexual acts — ranging from exhibitionism to penetration — that involve threats of physical force, intimidation and deception.''' (157)

"The National College Women Sexual Victimization Survey (NCWSVS) reports the rate for college women to be 27.7 rapes per 1000 female students." (157)

"In one study of 650 college-age women. 42% reported that they had been victims of sexual coercion, but only 28% of the victims sought help. Among those who did seek help, most (75%) sought it from a friend rather than from a professional" (158). 
  

(7)    Value: This article contains valuable research that is conducted on exactly what I am writing about in my paper. The writers define the most significant and common barriers students feel when they are reporting sexual assault such as saying "it was a minor incident" or "they did not want the perpetrator to get in trouble". It is important to define the reasons why victims do not feel comfortable reporting sexual assault so that they receive the emotional guidance and counseling that they deserve. This information is valuable because it is a factual study that was conducted on college students. 


Friday, March 17, 2017

Literature Review #3

(1)    Visual: Elizabeth A. Armstrong

(2)    Citation:  Armstrong, A. Elizabeth, Hamilton, Lauren, and Brian Sweeney. Sexual Assault on Campus: A Multilevel, Integrative Approach to Party Rape. Soc Probl 2006; 53 (4): 483-499. doi: 10.1525/sp.2006.53.4.483. Web. 28 Feb. 2017.

(3)    Summary: This scholarly article is written about the results from a study that was conducted as an ethnographic observation in a midwestern university. The team conducted student interviews in a "party dorm" about various aspects that pertain to sexual assault. They found that sexual assault is surprisingly a predictive outcome due to factors of being in a "party dorm" atmosphere and surrounded by individuals who interact with one another for the wrong reasons. 

(4)    Author(s): Elizabeth A. Armstrong is a sociologist who writes and researches about topics such as gender, sexuality, culture, and social movements. She has been a professor at the University of Michigan and the University of Indiana in the Sociology departments. She is knowledgeable in her field due to her accreditations at Harvard University and the extensive amount of research she has done in these topics. 

(5)    Key terms: 
Gender Inequality: refers to unequal treatment or perceptions of individuals based on their gender. It arises from differences in socially constructed gender roles. 

Peer Culture: is defined as a stable set of activities or routines, artifacts, values, and concerns that children and youth produce and share with peers. 

(6)    Quotes:
1.   "Colleges and universities have been aware of the problem of sexual assault for at least 20 years, directing resources toward prevention and providing services to students who have been sexually assaulted...Rates of sexual assault, however, have not declined over the last five decades (Adams-Curtis and Forbes 2004:95; Bachar and Koss 2001; Marine 2004; Sampson 2002:1)" (484). 
2.  "Ayres Boswell and Joan Spade (1996) suggest that sexual assault is supported not only by “a generic culture surrounding and promoting rape,” but also by characteristics of the “specific settings” in which men and women interact (p. 133)" (485). 

3.  "Sexual assault education should shift in emphasis from educating women on preventative measures to educating both men and women about the coercive behavior of men and the sources of victim-blaming" (496). 

(7)    Value: This scholarly article helps me understand reasons why sexual assault occurs at college. Due to the environment, drinking culture, and lack of regulations of the universities there is an increased amount of incidents that occur. Although my paper isn't on how sexual assault occurs, it is a useful resource in understanding why victims and universities respond the way that they do. 






Research Blog #5: Bibliography with Five Scholarly Sources

Works Cited
Armstrong, A. Elizabeth, Hamilton, Lauren, and Brian Sweeney. Sexual Assault on Campus: A Multilevel, Integrative Approach to Party Rape. Soc Probl 2006; 53 (4): 483-499. doi: 10.1525/sp.2006.53.4.483. Web. 28 Feb. 2017.


Dick, Kirby, and Amy Ziering. The Hunting Ground: The Inside Story Of Sexual Assault On American College Campuses. n.p.: Online Submission, 2016. ERIC. Web. 28 Feb. 2017.


Germain, Lauren J. Campus Sexual Assault: College Women Respond. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2016. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 28 Feb. 2017.


Hovelson, Sonia, et al. “After a Sexual Assault: What to Do.” Contemporary OB/GNY, vol. 61, no. 12, December. 2016. Pp. 17-49. EBSCOhost. https://login.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=120397461&site=eds-live


Maiuro, Roland D. Perspectives on College Sexual Assault: Perpetrator, Victim, and Bystander. Springer Publishing Company, 2015. EBSCOhost. https://login.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=1102916&site=eds-live

Sable, Marjorie R., et al. "Barriers to Reporting Sexual Assault for Women and Men: Perspectives of College Students." Journal of American College Health, vol. 55, no. 3-, 01 Jan. 2006, pp. 157-162. EBSCOhost, login.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ767223&site=eds-live
Sprague, Carolyn. "Sexual Assault and Rape." Research Starters: Sociology (Online Edition), 2015. EBSCOhost, login.proxy.libraries.rutgers.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ers&AN=89185694&site=eds-live